Posts Tagged ‘hippy’

the art of making money beautifully

February 14, 2012

i purchased tara gentile’s the art of earning e-book today.  since i’ve become homeless by choice, with my entire life packed into my car, traveling from one place to another a-calling on friends, i’ve started to do some hard thinking about how much simplicity should be mandatory in a person’s life for them to be able to own their own small business.  how much i need to pare down to be able to work doing what i love.  i have had an etsy shop since 2007, selling on average 1.5 items per month, which isn’t bad for someone just dabbling.  i’ve always thought of money as tara quotes kelly diels:

I’m not terribly motivated by money. Shiny things, yes. Money, no. When I have enough, when the survival mark is made, I lose interest in making any more.

but i’ve repeatedly considered what it would take to be able to support myself.  the numbers are staggering when considered.  for me to pay my 2 bills, allow myself 1 tank of gas per week, $50 per week for food and incidentals, $30/month for dog food- in other words, the bare minimum- i would need $500.  i can’t be homeless forever, so add onto that the exceptional price of $300/month for a magical all utilities paid apartment, and you have a bare minimum needed of $800/month.  with an average of thirty days per month, i would need to make $26.70/day.  if i could sell one hat per day at that price plus shipping, it could work out- provided i could make it to the post office with the gas on my allowance.  but that’s just the bare minimum.  what if i got sick and needed to go to the doctor, or my tire blew on my car?  i would have no buffer.  so if i added $200 in savings to that a month, that would make it $1000/month for all of my expenses.  that brings the total up to $33.30/day.  i can knit one hat a day if i spend four or five solid hours knitting.  but would i be able to physically knit every day for five hours?  what if no one bought hats in a month?  what if five hours wasn’t enough to make a hat that i could sell for $33.30 plus shipping?

this is just to point out that my current hat-selling business is going to have to change, i’m afraid.  haberdashery just ain’t what it used to be.  i’m an obsessive knitter, though, so rest assured there will still be a few tams available for sale at all times.

this is why i turned to tara, and i am hoping that her e-book helps me formulate an idea for a profitable business.  i have a few ideas and i’m looking forward to exploring them.  and i’m looking forward to getting settled somewhere again where i can set my plans into motion.  i’ll let you know how it goes.

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high five! fingerless gloves

November 29, 2011

it took me a long time to learn to knit in the round.  and while i’ve gotten to a place where i love it, i have to say that in my heart i am what most would call a quite lazy knitter.  therefore, i offer up to you this pattern for fingerless gloves… knit flat!  and don’t fret, DPN fans- you’ll need 3 pairs of needles to make these, 2 of one size and 4 of another size 2 sizes up from the first.  for this pair in the picture i used size 8s and 10s.

high five!

this is a very simple pattern and is easy to modify to make it bigger, smaller, longer, shorter.  feel free to use your own different stitches.  and send me a link if you post your finished projects anywhere- i’d love to see what you came up with!

you will need:

  • 1 pair size 8 (or whichever) needles
  • 2 pairs size 10 (or whichever) needles OR 3 size 10 needles and an afghan crochet hook
  • 1 crochet hook (size I or J works)
  • worsted/medium (or whichever) weight yarn (separate off 3-6 yards for thumb gusset)

pattern

cast on 26 sts.  work in k1, p1 ribbing for 8 rows.

row 9: (rs) kf&b in first 2 sts.  k until 2 sts remain.  kf&b in last 2 sts. (30 sts)

row 10 (and all ws rows of body saving the last): purl.

row 11: k 14 sts, kf&b in next 2 sts, k 14 sts.

row 13: k 14 sts, kf&b in next st, k 2 sts, kf&b in next st, k 14 sts.

row 15: k 14 sts, kf&b in next st, k 4 sts, kf&b in next st, k 14 sts.

row 17: k 14 sts, kf&b in next st, k 6 sts, kf&b in next st, k 14 sts.

row 19: k 14 sts, kf&b in next st, k 8 sts, kf&b in next st, k 14 sts.

you can continue like this to make the thumb wider- just increase the number of sts between the kf&b sts.

thumb

row 21: slip 15 sts onto one size 10 needle or afghan hook.

1

attach the scrap yarn and knit the next 10 sts with another needle.

turn and purl across the back.

turn and knit across.  turn and purl across.

5

bind off with crochet hook or very loose knitting.

6

cut, leaving a long tail to sew up thumb.  you can either sew it up straightaway or knit the rest of it and then sew it up.  a mattress stitch works great on this.

hand

transfer the 15 slipped stitches back to the other needle, so they’re all on the same needle in a line.  knit across (30 sts).

6

continue in stockinette stitch for as long as you would like the glove to be.  on the last ws row, knit instead of purl, and then bind off with a crochet hook.  sew up the side of glove and thumb.

i hope you enjoy!

bulky single-crochet tam

October 16, 2011

bringing more patterns over from their old home on quazen!

for this pattern, you will need bulky weight yarn and a K hook.  it’s worked in rows instead of in a spiral, but if you’re more comfortable with a spiral method, please use it; just make sure you mark the beginnings of your rows (i tend to get lost using the spiral method.)

Row 1 – From the beginning stitch, ch 2 (counts as first sc- throughout the pattern the first ch-2 will always count as the first sc).  Sc 5 more times in beginning st, and connect to first sc with a sl st.  You should now have 6 sc in a loop.

Row 2 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  2 sc in each st around.

Row 3 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 4 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 5 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 3 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 6 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 4 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 7 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 5 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 8 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 6 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 9 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 7 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 10 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 8 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 11 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 9 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 12 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 10 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 13 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 11 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 14 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 12 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 15 – Ch 2.  Sc in same stitch.  *Sc in next 13 st, 2 sc in next st.  Repeat from * around.

Row 16 – Ch 2.  Sc in each st.

Repeat row 16 ten more times.

Row 27 – Ch 2.  *Sc dec over next two stitches.  Repeat from * around.  If you don’t know how to do a sc dec or sc2tog, here’s a great video.

Row 28 – Ch 3.  Dc in each st around.

Row 29 – Ch 3.  *Fpdc in next st, bpdc in next st.  Repeat from * around.  The links provided will give you a tutorial if you don’t know these stitches.

Row 30 – Ch 3.  Fpdc in each fpdc and bpdc in each bpdc around.

Row 31 – Repeat row 30.

You can continue row 30 for as long as you need to to make a longer brim, but I’ve found that with bulky yarn, 2-3 rows of fpdc/bpdc ribbing works great.

peace and love!

knitting as meditation

June 16, 2011

i took to knitting very late in life.  my neighbor taught me to crochet when i was 9, but knitting was something i could never wrap my mind around.  my mother tried no less than 7 times to teach me, and it finally stuck when i was 23 and ready to boost my image as an indie kid.  after that i attended several knitting meetups in various locations, jealously working my slow stockinette as the other girls showed off their socks, scarves and sweaters.  i loved knitting because it seemed so smooth, so refined- but the fact that it took me three weeks to finish a hat, as opposed to three hours with crochet, was a huge turnoff.  i considered myself one of those closet knitters who could keep a project in the basket to work on in spare moments, like the afghan you start and plan on finishing in twenty years.

another turnoff was the stress of it.  knitting to relax?  what a joke!  aside from the frustration of my slow hands, dropped stitches never failed to send me into a tizzy, and, once i learned to properly “frog” (which i just recently learned is the term for tearing something apart) the problem was then how to attempt projects with written patterns.  it’s one thing to slip into a zen coma while performing the same stitch in a circle for hours, but reading a pattern where things are constantly changing required a level of attention i did not find relaxing in the slightest.

but a recent turnaround occurred when i actually finished a project from a pattern, and then another.  i realized that maybe i could knit a little faster than i had originally thought.  and then tonight, counting two by two as i worked a rib pattern, i was startled out of my counting by the obnoxious sound of a taco john’s ad.  it took me a minute to realize that i had been so into my knitting that i had zoned out completely- and it had felt pretty damn peaceful.

maybe there’s a potential for knitting as meditation after all.  i’ll try to find out this weekend at the love your mother earth festival and report back for your reading pleasure.

peace and love.